Cabildo Building

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This site is on the Heritage Asset Inventory which is the official list of Trinidad and Tobago’s historic sites that are worthy of notation and preservation. The register is authorized by the National Trust of Trinidad and Tobago’s Council and is by no means exhaustive. The sites on the Heritage Asset Register are not owned by the National Trust of Trinidad and Tobago. The Trust welcomes any historical information and oral histories the public wishes to share with us concerning this site via the feedback form.

Cabildo Building is a property of interested located on a parcel of land situated in the City of Port of Spain, bounded on the north and east by Nos. 23-27, St Vincent Street (“Cabildo Chambers”), on the south by Sackville Street and on the west by the TTPS Police Administration Building.

The Cabildo Building is one of Trinidad’s few remaining examples of Spanish colonial styled tropical architecture. This domestic urban structure features thick walls (constructed in “Latin Moorish Style”) and an interior courtyard with a fountain. The building also includes a small museum.

This structure was most likely used as the office or residence of the Registrar. It translates from Spanish as Town Council.  A Cabildo was first established in Trinidad in 1592 while the country was under Spanish rule. During the Spanish colonial era the Cabildo governed all of Trinidad but the focus was placed on urban development. The Cabildo as a legislative institution controlled many intangible aspects of everyday living including taxation and investment in fixed structures (such as the construction of fish and flesh markets). They were a necessary intermediary body between the people (land owning and slaving owning plantocracy) and Provincial Governors who represented the wishes of the Crown

There are very few remaining tangible pieces of evidence related to Trinidad’s Spanish colonial heritage and more specifically to Spanish colonial rule. The presence of a built heritage site, done in ‘Spanish style suited to Tropical architecture’ is a unique and therefore important architectural feature that should be preserved. Listing this site would be an opportunity to preserve the last remnants of tangible heritage and offer a glimpse into our system of governance under Spanish rule and the interconnectedness of the City as the country transitioned from Spanish to British rule.

Other Known Name: Cabildo Law Museum

Address: 6 Sackville Street

Town/City: Port of Spain

Region: Port of Spain

Site Type: Cultural Heritage

Ownership: Public

Public Accessibility: Limited Access

Grade:Grade 2 – property in which material change may be permitted, provided that similarity is maintained in all respects as its original composition, shape and form.

Cultural Community: Spanish

Site Features: Public Buildings

 

Address:

6 Sackville Street, Port of Spain